Religious Liberty

Religious Liberty (1962)

“Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment or religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”  – Bill of Rights, Article 1.

National Women’s League believes that the maintenance and furtherance of religion are the responsibilities of the synagogue, the church and the home, and not the public school system.

We are deeply committed to the fostering of religion in the home and by the synagogue. We are equally committed to the American belief that religion is private and personal and should not be controlled, interfered with, or supported by government or state agencies.

We believe that the principle of separation of church and state has contributed greatly to the preservation of our democratic form of government and has strengthened religious groups in our country.

We reaffirm our commitment to the principle of strict separation of church and state. We oppose the utilization in any manner of time, facilities, personnel or funds of the public school system for purposes of religious instruction such as:

  1. Released time, dismissed time and shared time programs.
  2. The teaching of so-called “common core” religion.
  3. Bible reading and distribution of bibles in public schools.
  4. Public school observances of any religious holidays.

We applaud the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that ruled the New York Regents Prayer in public schools unconstitutional. This has been hailed as a milestone in the maintenance of religious liberty and separation of church and state.

We oppose those proposed constitutional amendments introduced by members of Congress to circumvent the decision on prayer. These would permit a so-called “non-denominational” prayer in public schools.

We reaffirm our opposition to government aid to schools under the supervision or control of any religious denomination or sect. (See resolution on Federal Aid to Education)

Religious Liberty (1960)

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” – Bill of Rights, Article I

Religion has always been and continues to be the central core of Jewish life. But the maintenance and furtherance of religion are the responsibilities of the synagogue, the church and the home, and not of the public school system.

National Women’s League is deeply committed to the fostering of religion in the home and by the synagogue. We are equally committed to the American concept that religion is private and personal and should not be controlled, interfered with or supported by government or state agencies.

We believe that the principle of separation of church and state has contributed greatly to the preservation of our democratic form of government and has encouraged the strengthening of religious groupings in our country. It is a gratifying phenomenon of American life that our religious institutions remain vigorous and independent, and participate fully in the social and political life of the nation.

We affirm our commitment to the principle of strict separation of church and state, and to the positions and policies which are set forth in the pamphlet, “Safeguarding Religious Liberty.”

Specifically, we reaffirm our opposition to the utilization in any manner of time, facilities, personnel or funds of the public school system for purposes of religious instruction, such as:

  1. Released time and dismissal time programs
  2. The teaching of a so-called “common core” religion
  3. Bible reading and the distribution of Bibles in the public schools
  4. Public school observances of any religious holidays

We reaffirm our opposition to governmental aid to schools under the supervision or control of any religious denomination or sect, whether Jewish, Protestant or Catholic, including outright subsidies, transportation, textbooks and other supplies. We are not opposed to the use of any school for the provision of lunches, medical and dental services to children.

Religious Liberty (1958)

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” – Bill of Rights, Article I

National Women’s League is deeply committed to the fostering of religion in the home and by the synagogue. We are equally committed to the American concept that religion is private and personal and should not be controlled, interfered with or supported by government or state agencies.

We believe that the principle of separation of church and state has contributed greatly to the preservation of our democratic form of government and has encouraged the strengthening of religious groupings in our country.