United Nations

United Nations: World Day of Social Justice (2008)

(20 February, beginning in 2009)

The United Nations General Assembly has decided to celebrate 20 February each year as the World Day of Social Justice, beginning in 2009. By its resolution 62/10 of 26 November 2007, the Assembly recognized that the attainment of social development and social justice are indispensable for the achievement and maintenance of peace and security and yet cannot be attained without peace, security and respect for all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The Assembly recognized that broad-based and sustained economic growth in the context of sustainable development is necessary to sustain social development and social justice, but that serious challenges remain, including serious financial crises, insecurity, poverty, exclusion and inequality within and among societies and considerable obstacles to the further integration and full participation of developing countries and some countries with economies in transition in the global economy.

United Nations: International Year of Human Rights Learning (2008)

The United Nations General Assembly has proclaimed the year commencing on 10 December 2008 as the International Year of Human Rights Learning, to be devoted to activities to broaden and deepen human rights learning based on the principles of universality, indivisibility, interdependency, impartiality, objectivity and non-selectivity, constructive dialogue and cooperation (resolution 62/171 of 18 December 2007). It aims to enhance the promotion and protection of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development.

United Nations: International Year for the Rapprochement of Cultures 2010 (2008)

The United Nations General Assembly, on 17 December 2007, declared 2010 the International Year for the Rapprochement of Cultures (resolution 62/90). It recommended that events be organized on interreligious and intercultural dialogue, understanding and cooperation for peace during the year, including a high-level dialogue and/or informal interactive hearings with civil society.

Affirming that mutual understanding and inter-religious dialogue constitute important dimensions of the dialogue among civilizations and the culture of peace for practical action at all levels of society to promote interreligious and intercultural dialogue, tolerance, understanding, and cooperation. It also encouraged the promotion of dialogue among the media of all cultures and civilizations.

United Nations: International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust (27 January) (2008)

On 1 November 2005, the United Nations General Assembly designated 27 January as an annual International Day of Commemoration in memory of the victims of the Holocaust conducted during the Second World War by the Nazi regime (resolution 60/7). In doing so, the Assembly rejected any denial of the Holocaust as an historical event, either in full or part.

By other terms of resolution 60/7, the Assembly urged member states to develop educational programs to inculcate future generations with the lessons of the Holocaust in order to prevent future acts of genocide. It commended those states which have actively engaged in preserving those sites that served as Nazi death camps, concentration camps, forced labor camps, and prisons during the Holocaust. It requested that the Secretary-General establish a program of outreach on the subject of the Holocaust and the United Nations as well as measures to mobilize civil society for Holocaust remembrance and education.

United Nations: International Day of Remembrance of Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade (25 March) (2008)

Recognizing how little is known about the 400-year long trans-Atlantic slave trade and its lasting consequences felt throughout the world, the United Nations General Assembly has designated 25 March as an annual International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the trans Atlantic Slave Trade (resolution 62/122 of 17 December 2007). The Assembly asked the Secretary-General to establish a program of educational outreach to mobilize educational institutions and civil society, among others, on the subject of remembering the trans-Atlantic slave trade and slavery in order to inculcate future generations with the causes, consequences and lessons of the slave trade and to communicate the dangers of racism and prejudice.

This designation makes perennial the Assembly’s observance of 25 March 2007 as the International Day for the Commemoration of the Two-hundredth anniversary of the Abolition of the trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.

United Nations 50th Anniversary (1994)

1995 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the United Nations, a time for reflection and commemoration. This milestone anniversary provides an opportunity to take stock of the accomplishments of the UN in the political, economic and humanitarian arenas, and to move towards fulfillment of the unfinished agenda.

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism has actively supported the UN since its inception, and continues to participate in the United Nations program through the League’s Non-governmental status.

These past 50 years have seen the growth in the number of member States, with many successful ventures in the fields of health, human rights, social and economic development, and in achieving and maintaining peace in vital areas of the world. We are encouraged by trends indicating a return to the principles of western democracy. We note the increasingly favorable climate at the UN for Israel, particularly since the rescinding of Resolution 3379 equating Zionism with Racism. We applaud the United Nations for this major step.

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism reaffirms its commitment to the spirit of the UN Charter, with the fervent wish for a safe, secure, peaceful world, for the benefit of all humankind. We urge our affiliated Sisterhoods to note this special occasion with appropriate programs and commemorations during the course of 1995.

United Nations (1992)

Fourth United Nations Development Decade, 1991 – 2000

The period of January 1, 1991, through December 31, 2000 has bee declared by the General Assembly as the Fourth United Nations Development Decade. The major aim was to ensure that the 1990’s would see increased development in the developing countries and strengthened cooperation within the international community. It is hoped that during this decade there will be a significant improvement in the human condition and a reduction in the gap between rich and poor countries.

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism urges its membership to support these goals which reflect the undertaking in the United Nations Charter to promote social progress and better living standards for all.

Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of the United Nations (1986)

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism has been an active supporter of the establishment of the United Nations since its inception, and a participant in its program through its non-governmental status.

On the occasion of the 40th Anniversary of the United Nations, Women’s League for Conservative Judaism wishes to express its continuing support for the goals of the United Nations as expressed in its Charter, and to commend it for its great strides in bringing nations together to combat disease, pollution, illiteracy and malnutrition, and for the promotion of human dignity and equal rights. We also note the establishment of the State of Israel as one of the monumental events of recent history.

There is no denying, however, that the member nations have failed to effectively combat terrorism, secure sovereign borders, and achieve universal peace and security. The politicization of many United Nations Agencies has been a source of great dismay. The resolution equating Zionism with Racism is in direct contradiction to the Charter of the UN>. The continuing isolation of Israel, anti-West rhetoric and the application of a double standard fall far short of the lofty ideals envisioned at the founding of the United Nations.

It is the fervent wish of Women’s League for Conservative Judaism that the next 40 years mark a return to the original spirit of the United Nations Charter; that the implementation of these goals be approached with renewed vigor for the benefit of all humankind; and that we may be privileged to witness a world where, in the words of the Prophet Isaiah, “Nation shall not lift up sword against nation; neither shall they learn war anymore.”

Anti-Semitism at the United Nations (1984)

The last session (38th) of the United Nations General Assembly was characterized by an ominous upsurge of anti-Semitism which converted the world body into one of the foremost contemporary forums of international anti-Semitism.

Verbal assaults on the Jewish people by the Libyan, Syrian, Iranian, and the Soviet bloc representatives, among others, continue in increased numbers.

The escalation of anti-Semitic rhetoric at the United Nations – whether overt or couched in the euphemisms of “anti-Zionist” and “anti-Israel” campaigns and resolutions — has been largely responsible for the resurgence of anti-Semitism world-wide and for the resulting numerous acts of anti-Jewish violence in recent years.

Women’s League considers it essential that the ugly and vicious anti-Semitic rhetoric at the United Nations be confronted without delay in a firm and unambiguous manner, and, therefore, urges its Sisterhoods to:

  1. Petition government delegations to publicly express indignation at the use of epithets and slurs of a racial, religious or personal nature during debate and in all conduct of business at the United Nations.
  2. Endorse the appeal of Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar “to all members to refrain from language unbecoming to serious international debate.”

United Nations Reform (1982)

The United Nations was created in 1945, based on western philosophy and democratic ideals. From the original 51 member nations, the United Nations has grown to 157 in 1982. With the rapid growth in membership of the United Nations, democratic ideals have been eroded. We are experiencing an attack upon the West, including the United States and Israel, from the Communist Bloc, the Third World, and the Arab Nations.

Anti-Zionist Resolutions have hurt the United Nations as well as Israel by diminishing the stature and credibility of the United Nations.

The government of the United States, which contributes 25% of the total United Nations budget, thinks the time for United Nations reform is now.

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism calls upon its Sisterhoods to urge the United States Government to:

  • Continue to support the reform and restructuring of the United Nations with the goal of returning to the ideals and principles of the United Nations Charter, including:
    1. Peace and security for all nations;
    2. Commitment to Human Rights;
    3. Condemnation and elimination of terrorism;
    4. Fostering the principles of democracy, and encouraging and nurturing the development of democratic nations;
    5. Protecting the environment.
  • Withhold funding from those specialized agencies which violate the provisions, mandates and spirit of the United Nations Charter.

United Nations (1978)

World Hunger and Food Supply

Women’s League for Conservative Judaism recognizes that the problem of hunger is a human problem transcending national and political boundaries, and that we live in an age of mutual interdependence.

Therefore, we urge the World Food Council to initiate the following:

  1. Food Priorities: Food priority countries (FPC’s) should be given special treatment by governments and the United Nations agencies.
  2. Food Security: All countries with grain stocks accumulated as a result of good harvests should make special efforts to ensure continuity of supply to countries relying on imports. Within the framework of a new International Grains Arrangement, negotiations should proceed to establish an international system of nationally held reserves.
  3. Food Aid: Governments should give high priority to reducing hunger and improving nutrition and should make this a major objective of their development plans.
  4. Food Trade: All countries, particularly developed countries, should stabilize, liberalize and expand world food trade, thereby facilitating increased food production in developing countries and stimulating their exports.
  5. Supporting Measures: In support of the above measures, donor countries should increase their official development assistance, agencies should accelerate their efforts in rural development, and governments and agencies should support the “basic needs” approach.

United Nations (1978)

Annual United Nations Day Observance

The United Nations has grown from 51 to 151 countries in 33 years. Lacking sovereign power, it can only accomplish what these member nations are willing to support. Thus, it represents the world as it is today. Despite this limitation, it has made contributions to international peace-keeping, to the self determination of some nations, to economic and social development in some areas and to some advancement of human rights.

We believe that the United Nations is greatly in need of improvement as an essential element in the structure of a peaceful world. This improvement can only result from constructive policies based on informed research and discussion of issues confronting each country and the United Nations.

We urge our members to initiate study groups on the United Nations with the intention of communicating their informed opinions to their government representatives.

We also urge them to plan substantive issues programs (such as programs on environment, human rights, arms control, world hunger, Law of the Sea) on a Branch and local level in conjunction with the annual observance of United Nations Day on October 24th.

UNICEF (1976)

As an organization of Jewish women and mothers, we are deeply concerned about children of every race, country and creed. We applaud the cooperation of Israel in implementing UNICEF projects. We resolve to continue to wholeheartedly support UNICEF’s life-giving and essential programs and projects to care for the homeless, to combat disease, to banish illiteracy and to furnish the means whereby the world’s children may be aided to grow up in a happier and peaceful world.

United Nations (1962)

“And they shall beat their swords into ploughshares

and their spears into pruning hooks;

Nation shall not lift up sword against nation.

Neither shall they learn war any more.”

National Women’s League believes that the United Nations is the force which will help to achieve world peace, advance the dignity of every human being and safeguard human rights and fundamental freedoms for all.

We support all efforts to increase public understanding of the goals and accomplishments of the United Nations for maintaining world peace and raising the standards of developing nations. We urge government agencies, mass media, private organizations, community and Sisterhood leaders to disseminate information about the United Nations and its relation to the welfare of our country, thus negating the influence of extremist groups (right and left) who viciously attack the UN.

United Nations Decade of Development (1962)

National Women’s League supports President Kennedy’s proposal to the UN that the 1960’s become a Decade of Development when poverty, ignorance and disease will be eliminated.

We recommend that our Government increase its aid and technical assistance to the developing countries through the United Nations.

United Nations Bond Issue (1962)

We commend the 87th Congress for granting President Kennedy the power to purchase up to 100 million dollars in United Nations Bonds. Efforts by many Sisterhoods urging their legislators to pass this legislation played an important role.

United Nations (1960)

“For want of counsel, purposes are frustrated:

But in the multitude of counselors, they are established.” – Proverbs 15:22

To express our devotion to Judaism which gives us the hope of ultimate universal peace with justice for all people; to express our dedication to the preservation of the democratic way of life and our belief in the interdependence of all the people of the world:

We call upon our government to add to the moral authority of the United Nations by attempting in every way possible to meet the major problems of the world through the United Nations in its work towards the establishment of peace through international cooperation. We salute the United Nations on its fifteenth year of fruitful development to meet the needs of an ever-changing world.

We pledge our support to the United Nations as the world’s most effective instrument to achieve improved economic, social and cultural standards in the developing nations necessary to human dignity.

We urge our government to maintain and increase the financial support of the various specialized agencies of the United Nations, such as, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), WHO (World Health Organization), FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization), and UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund).

United Nations (1958)

“And they shall beat their swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning hooks.

Nation shall not lift up sword against nation

Neither shall they learn war any more.” – Isaiah 2:3-4

Heeding the universal message of peace and justice enunciated and proclaimed by our prophets of old, National Women’s League continues to pray and work towards the attainment of these ideals.

We affirm and pledge our support to the United Nations as the world’s best instrument yet conceived for mobilizing international cooperation in the quest for enduring peace and human advancement.

We continue to urge our Sisterhoods to study, and to promote widespread understanding of the aims of the United Nations, its problems and achievements, and to dedicate their organizational strength in support of the efforts of the United Nations to build a better world.

We pledge ourselves to combat the false doctrines and misinformation disseminated by enemies of the United Nations who oppose participation in any international undertaking.

We call upon our government to continue their moral and financial support to the United Nations and its specialized agencies.

United Nations (1956)

“And they shall beat their swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning hooks.

Nation shall not lift up sword against nation

Neither shall they learn war any more.” – Isaiah 2:3-4

Imbued with faith in the ultimate establishment of universal peace based on justice for all mankind, which our prophets were the first to proclaim, National Women’s League steadfastly continues to pray and work for the attainment of this ideal.

We pledge our support to the United Nations as the world’s best instrument for mobilizing international cooperation in the quest for enduring peace and human advancement. We pledge ourselves to combat the false doctrines and misinformation disseminated by those who oppose participation in the United Nations as well as in other international undertakings.

We urge our Sisterhoods to promote widespread understanding of the aims of the United Nations, its problems and achievements, and to dedicate their organizational strength in support of the efforts of the United Nations to build a better world.

We call upon our government to strengthen the United Nations and give firm moral and financial support to its agencies. We urge, especially:

  1. Exertion of strong influence by our government through the United Nations to lessen explosive international tensions in various critical areas. (See also Resolution on Israel)
  2. Unremitting perseverance by our government in the United Nations to achieve world disarmament under an adequate enforceable system of inspection and control.
  3. Intensive efforts to establish the International Atomic Energy Agency for the development of atomic energy for peaceful uses to benefit mankind.
  4. Utmost care by our government when building a regional system of collective security to conform with the Charter of the United Nations.
  5. Bi-partisan United States Foreign Policy on issues before the United Nations.
  6. Political and financial support of an expanded United Nations Technical Assistance Program of United Nations specialized agencies. (See also Resolution on Technical Assistance)
  7. Revitalization of United States leadership in the field of human rights in the United Nations.

We urge our government to take firm steps to safeguard the integrity of American citizenship and rights by:

  1. notifying all nations that our government will not tolerate discrimination against American citizens because of their race or religion;
  2. instructing all agencies of government to desist from screening qualified American citizens for military, diplomatic or other service in a foreign country solely because of objections by that country to American citizens on racial or religious grounds;
  3. providing expressly in all treaties and executive agreements with foreign countries that American citizens shall not be denied rights of travel, employment, trade or any other rights under such agreements because of their race or religion.

United Nations Day (1956)

Believing that widespread celebration of October 24 each year as United Nations Day – a day for review of and rededication to the principles on which the United Nations was founded – will result in better knowledge of the goals and activities of the United Nations and strengthen the will to peace throughout the world, National Women’s League urges Sisterhoods to participate in the observance of United Nations Day.

Because education is indispensable in assuring success for steps to peace, Sisterhoods are urged to also bring information to their members throughout the year and to encourage study groups about the United Nations.

United Nations (1954)

“And the work of righteousness shall be peace: and the effect of righteousness, calm and confidence forever.” – Isaiah 32:17

Motivated by Judaism’s ideals, National Women’s League aligns itself with those forces which strive to establish a peaceful world with freedom and justice for all. With faith in the ultimate realization of this ideal, we pledge our support to the United Nations as the world’s best instrument for establishing peace through international cooperation.

We urge Sisterhoods to rededicate themselves to promote widespread awareness of the United Nations, its achievements and constructive work, and support its program toward building an enduring peace.

We pledge ourselves to combat the misinformation and distrust spread by enemies of the United Nations and by isolationist minorities who oppose American participation in any international covenants.

We call upon the government of the United States to strengthen the United Nations and give strong moral and financial support to United Nations’ agencies.

We advocate the following:

  1. Continuous United States efforts in the United Nations to achieve enforceable world disarmament under an adequate system of inspection and control.
  2. Implementation of President Eisenhower’s proposals leading to the collective international development of atomic power for peaceful and humanitarian purposes.
  3. Adherence by the United States to the United Nations Charter in building a regional system of collective security as part of a United Nations plan of universal collective security.
  4. Exertion of United States influence through the United Nations in lessening explosive tensions in various critical areas. (see also Resolution on Israel)
  5. Revitalization of United States leadership in the field of Human Rights in the United Nations and the ratification of Human Rights Covenants. We urge immediate Senate ratification of Genocide Convention (see Resolution on Genocide Convention) and of the Convention on the Political Rights of Women.
  6. Political and financial support of an enlarged United Nations Technical Assistance Program and of United Nations Specialized Agencies.
  7. Bi-partisan United States Foreign Policy on issues before the United Nations.

United Nations (1952)

“Not by Might nor by Power but by My Spirit, Saith the Lord of Hosts.” – Zachariah 4:6

WHEREAS, a basic aim of Judaism is to establish a better society where peace, justice and equity shall prevail, and

WHEREAS, the United Nations under it Charter offers the world its best hope for peace and the betterment of mankind, and

WHEREAS, the United States has given strong moral leadership and material aid to the United Nations,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the National Women’s League of the United Synagogue reaffirm its confidence in the United Nations, its various agencies and their objectives to bring peace and to solve mankind’s basic problems of hunger, disease, illiteracy and poverty which lead to unrest and war,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we urge our Government to give fullest possible political, financial and moral support to the United Nations, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizations (UNESCO), World Health Organization (WHO), and its other specialized agencies in their constructive efforts for a peaceful world, through the following:

  1. Acceptance of the principle of dealing with world problems through the UN, instead of nation by nation procedure,
  2. Unceasing efforts thru negotiation, conciliation and arbitration to explore every possible avenue which could lead to peace,
  3. Support of the UN efforts in the field of human rights,
  4. Ratification by the Senate of the Genocide Convention,
  5. Sustained efforts in behalf of Universal Disarmament,
  6. Support of UN Technical Assistance program, with emphasis on raising the standard of living of the populations,
  7. Support of the UN program of advancing the political, social and economic status of colonial peoples toward independence,
  8. Adequate appropriations for the UN and its agencies.

United Nations (1950)

Peace – Foreign Policy

WHEREAS, the aim of Judaism is to establish a better society where peace, justice and equity shall prevail, and

WHEREAS, the United Nations offers the world an ever ready mediating force and remains the strong hope for peace and the betterment of mankind, and

WHEREAS, from the first, the United States has given strong moral leadership and material aid to the United Nations to promote these ideals,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the National League of the United Synagogue, in convention assembled, reaffirm its confidence in the United Nations and its various agencies, and urge the United State to exert its powers within the United Nations to explore every avenue which may lead to peace.